Bookshelf

These are books I’ve read on parenting that I would give four- or five-stars:

Born to Buy by Juliet B. Schor
The Commercialized Child and the New Consumer Culture

The Sleepeasy Solution by Jennifer Waldburger and Jill Spivack
The Exhausted Parent’s Guide to Getting Your Child to Sleep from Birth to Age 5

Brain Rules for Baby by John Medina
How to Raise a Smart and Happy Child from Zero to Five

How To Raise An Amazing Child the Montessori Way by Tim Seldin

Becoming the Parent You Want To Be by Laura Davis
A Sourcebook of Strategies for the First Five Years

Hold On to Your Kids by Gabor Maté
Why Parents Need to Matter More Than Peers

Taking Back Childhood by Nancy Carlsson-Paige
A Proven Roadmap for Raising Confident, Creative, Compassionate Kids

Baby Hearts by Susan Goodwyn
A Guide to Giving Your Child an Emotional Head Start

NurtureShock by Po Bronson
New Thinking About Children

Mind in the Making by  Ellen Galinsky
The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs

Raising Happiness by Christine Carter
10 Simple Steps for More Joyful Kids and Happier Parents

Any other book recommendations I should check out? Let me know in the comments below.

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3 thoughts on “Bookshelf

  1. Wow, I’m humbled by your discipline! My hubby & I were both saying how we hope our daughter won’t have our same need for sweets but she’s already showing signs (“I want choclit”) that she’s emulating us in that area–ugh! I’m finding whatever I’m into (yum broccoli), she’s into (a good part of being 2 yrs old!) & if she helps make it (smoothies, etc), she likes it even more. We’ve been wanting (needing) to eliminate the processed & sugar-filled foods in our diet anyway so I’m going to try harder to be a better eater myself. Thanks for the inspiration!

  2. Great suggestions! There are some I’ve never heard of. Nurture Shock is at the top of my list of recommendations. I also loved Raising Cain, but it’s more suited to parents of tween/teen boys. Our school principal recommends The Family Virtues Guide at the Kindergarten intake, and it is amazing. I also found The Bright Kid Challenge so interesting, and would recommend it for parents of all kids (cause really, all our kids are bright, right?).

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